Paul Boddie's Free Software-related blog


Archive for December, 2016

Rename This Project

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

It is interesting how the CPython core developers appear to prefer to spend their time on choosing names for someone else’s fork of Python 2, with some rather expansionist views on trademark applicability, than on actually winning over Python 2 users to their cause, which is to make Python 3 the only possible future of the Python language, of course. Never mind that the much broader Python language community still appears to have an overwhelming majority of Python 2 users. And not some kind of wafer-thin, “first past the post”, mandate-exaggerating, Brexit-level majority, but an actual “that doesn’t look so bad but, oh, the scale is logarithmic!” kind of majority.

On the one hand, there are core developers who claim to be very receptive to the idea of other people maintaining Python 2, because the CPython core developers have themselves decided that they cannot bear to look at that code after 2020 and will not issue patches, let alone make new releases, even for the issues that have been worthy of their attention in recent years. Telling people that they are completely officially unsupported applies yet more “stick” and even less “carrot” to those apparently lazy Python 2 users who are still letting the side down by not spending their own time and money on realising someone else’s vision. But apparently, that receptivity extends only so far into the real world.

One often reads and hears claims of “entitlement” when users complain about developers or the output of Free Software projects. Let it be said that I really appreciate what has been delivered over the decades by the Python project: the language has kept programming an interesting activity for me; I still to this day maintain and develop software written in Python; I have even worked to improve the CPython distribution at times, not always successfully. But it should always be remembered that even passive users help to validate projects, and active users contribute in numerous ways to keep projects viable. Indeed, users invest in the viability of such projects. Without such investment, many projects (like many companies) would remain unable to fulfil their potential.

Instead of inflicting burdensome change whose predictable effect is to cause a depreciation of the users’ existing investments and to demand that they make new investments just to mitigate risk and “keep up”, projects should consider their role in developing sustainable solutions that do not become obsolete just because they are not based on the “latest and greatest” of the technology realm’s toys. If someone comes along and picks up this responsibility when it is abdicated by others, then at the very least they should not be given a hard time about it. And at least this “Python 2.8″ barely pretends to be anything more than a continuation of things that came before, which is not something that can be said about Python 3 and the adoption/migration fiasco that accompanies it to this day.